Mar 31,  2021

Introducing GCAL 8X

New York City, NY- GCAL develops new 8X™ Cut Grade Standard to distinguish the best of the best diamonds.

 

The global diamond industry has witnessed impressive advances in diamond cutting techniques. GCAL thinks it’s time to honor the craftsmanship that truly defines precision diamond cutting.

In today’s market, more than half of all Road Brilliant Cut diamonds are given ‘Excellent’ Cut grades, but less than 1% of those qualify as 8X™. The GCAL 8X™ Ultimate Cut Grade gives discerning buyers a way to confidently select the most brilliant and beautiful diamonds, even when purchasing online, sight unseen.

GCAL’s new standard focuses on EIGHT critical aspects of cut quality assessment. All eight must achieve a grade of Excellent for the diamond to earn the unprecedented grade of 8X™.

 

According to Angelo Palmieri, COO of GCAL, “A great many manufacturers have shared with us their frustration of having their precision cut diamonds judged on par with diamonds of a far lesser cut quality, yet graded equally,” He added, “Consumers can now identify the best color (D), the best clarity (Flawless), and finally, the pinnacle in cutting can be identified scientifically (8X™).”

 

“8X™ is the ultimate achievement in precision diamond cutting,” explained Don Palmieri, founder and president of GCAL. “It’s about providing a platform for the world’s premier diamond manufacturers to distinguish their products from all others.”

 

Angelo went on to explain how the GCAL team spent years of extensive research, gathering data from hundreds of thousands of diamonds to determine the exacting tolerances required to achieve the best precision cut round brilliant diamond. The result: GCAL’s 8X™ Ultimate Diamond Cut Grade

Gemprint, the world’s most sophisticated, non-invasive, positive identification technology that records the unique optical ‘fingerprint’ of each diamond is included with every 8X™ Guaranteed Certificate.

 

Read more about GCAL 8X™ here.

GCAL 8X Certificates_2.png

Dec 7, 2014

Gemprint Debuts on CSI

New York City, NY-  Angelo Palmieri, President of Gemprint Corp. proudly announces that the latest version "GEMPRINT" instrument made its debut on the CBS hit crime drama, CSI: Las Vegas on November 23, 2014. 

The episode entitled, "Road to Recovery" centers around the mysterious and tragic death of an expensively dressed young woman with a four carat diamond ring on her hand.  With no identification at the scene or fingerprints on file and no missing person report filed, the only physical evidence that can lead to an identification is the diamond.

The forensic experts discover that, of all the high tech, expensive, advanced, scientific, crime solving tools available to them, the only one that is capable of solving this mystery is Gemprint.   The victim's ring is placed in the Gemprint, and with images and graphics flashing, we learn that the diamond had indeed been Gemprinted and was registered in the international database to the husband of the dead woman.  Although there are the requisite twists and turns in the story line, the crime is solved thanks to the Gemprint technology.  

This episode of CSI is the second time Gemprint has been specifically written into popular crime dramas on TV.  Gemprint was used to solve a crime on Law and Order. 

The latest Gemprint instrument - as seen on CSI: Las Vegas - will be available in early 2015.  Among the many exclusive features, and in addition to producing the optical fingerprint of the diamond and its patented registration and recovery system, this model will take high resolution photomicrographs and produce the scientific measure of the light performance of the diamond - loose or mounted - all within a couple of minutes.

Perhaps most importantly, Gemprint is the only diamond identification and recovery system that qualifies for consumer insurance discounts on diamonds that are Gemprinted and registered.

For more information about the latest Gemprint System, please contact info@gemprint.com or call 888-GEMPRINT.

CSI Shots.jpg
GemPrint_HIRes_400.png
CSI Still.jpg

May 21, 2013

Gemprint and DNA Technologies partner on Forensic Mine to Market Solution

(New York, NY/Halifax, Canada)  Gemprint® Corp, a world leader in diamond identification, and DNA Technologies, a world leader in DNA based security markings, and a division of Polestar Ltd. (Bermuda), announced today that they had launched a Forensic Mine to Market, Chain of Custody Solution for the gems and jewelry industry. 

The process, known as Source Veritas®, encompasses patented technologies that both implement a DNA Marking and Tracking system and multi level security protocols marking rough diamonds at the mines, and Gemprint Fingerprint Technology for identifying polished diamonds after the cutting process.  The process will allow rough diamonds to be easily identifiable in the marketplace as coming from a specific country or mine

“As global interests from consumers, governments, and NGO’S mount for reasonable, cost effective, and secure tracking and identification systems for precious metals, diamonds, and gemstones, our companies found synergy in working together to fortify a responsible supply chain”, said Angelo Palmieri, President of Gemprint Corp.

Gemprint® has a 13 year history of assisting governments, law enforcement, diamantaires, NGO’s, and two of the largest mining companies to help track chain of custody for diamonds in both Canada and Botswana.

Source Veritas® allows consumers to feel confident about the source of their most prized possessions, while providing a transparent anti-crime, anti-counterfeiting, and anti-terrorism solution to protect our world’s most valuable and easily transportable assets; diamonds, gemstones, and precious metals.

According to Gemprint Chairman, Donald A. Palmieri, “Our companies, DNA and Gemprint, are based in two countries representing many of the most important stakeholders in the diamond industry.  We are instituting an effort to implement these proven advanced technologies to all customs agencies, law enforcement agencies, and governments at little cost, who need help in the fight against money laundering, civil wars, corruption, and terrorism where our industry’s products are misused for funding such activities.”

“Gemprint is a tremendous partner for us to help expand our reach in the diamond and precious gemstone markets.  They are ISO certified and well respected in their industry”, said Wendell Smith, Chairman of DNA Technologies.  “Our proposed system to use DNA marking for authentication and identification of legitimate rough diamonds is a natural extension of our DNA

Matrix™ technology, our patents and IP.  The DNA Matrix™ has already been used to protect high value items such as fine art, vintage wines, and premium brand names.”

The companies plan to demonstrate the new DNA Marking and Gemprint systems at the annual CBG and JCK shows in Las Vegas, May 28-June 3.

For more information about mine to market solutions for diamonds and colored stones, or for finished goods tracking and secured shipping, please visit http://www.gemprint.com/source-veritas.html

About Gemprint®
GEMPRINT® is the world’s most sophisticated, non-invasive, positive identification technology that records the unique optical ‘fingerprint’ of each diamond. Just like a human fingerprint, every diamond has a unique GEMPRINT®.  Invented in 1976, this patented and proven technology has been used by the FBI and the Canadian Government.  For more information, see www.gemprint.com.

About Source Veritas®
Source Veritas® is a process for verifying and labeling diamonds and other gemstones from mine to market to show country of origin and compliance with the Kimberley Process.  The process is designed to provide forensic evidence for legal, finance, security, and verification of any diamond, gemstone, or jewelry product for Chain of Custody.

About DNA Technologies 
DNA Technologies is a recognized leader in providing security marking and unequaled protection against counterfeiting and product diversion.  The patented technology uses DNA-laced inks, dyes and resins to tag and protect valuable products, brands, intellectual property and important documents.  The simple, yet complex product authentication solution can be applied to virtually any tangible surface, providing highly secure, but cost-effective marking. 

May 4, 2011

The Palmieri Group Concludes Acquisition of Gemprint and other IP Assets

New York City, NY (May 04, 2011)–  The Palmieri Group, founder and owner of GCAL (Gem Certification & Assurance Lab, Inc.), is pleased to inform the International Diamond and Gemstone Community that we have concluded the complete acquisition of all the business and assets of Gemprint®, the world’s most sophisticated, non-invasive diamond identification and registration system. The cash purchase included all of Gemprints’ worldwide patents, trademarks, copyrights, as well as, developmental prototypes, advanced software, databases (1978 – present) and all other remaining intellectual property relating to the identification, light performance, and diamond grading business, formerly owned by Collectors Universe, Inc.

GCAL has been utilizing Gemprint® technology in Botswana, Canada, China, India, Israel, and the U.S. to audit and support country of origin authenticity of diamonds for many years. In addition, all GCAL graded diamonds are Gemprinted and stored in the DiamondID® International Database. Angelo W. Palmieri, MBA, President of Gemprint®, will handle and coordinate all Gemprint® sales, service, and contractual agreements and integrate the new Gemprint® technology into the 33 year old international Gemprint® database. “We are excited to be able to share the new Gemprint® technology with all diamond laboratories, manufacturers, retailers, and most of all, consumers who seek positive identification protection of one of their most prized and sentimental possessions…their diamonds,” stated Angelo Palmieri.

Don Palmieri, GCAL’s President, who has used Gemprint since its inception in 1978, initiated a complete redesign of the Gemprint® instrumentation, application, and advanced software in 2008. The Gemprint® scanner has been redesigned as a gravity-fed, auto-alignment system, which eliminates the need for manual alignment and greatly curbs the chances of human error. The newly designed software allows matching against hundreds of thousands of images of registered diamonds within seconds. 

Many of our colleagues were current Gemprint® users and were appropriately upset when all outside connections to Gemprint® were shut down in 2006. A number of you who still have your digital Gemprint® scanners (1994 and later versions) are now eligible to reconnect to Gemprint® and enjoy free Gemprint® Registrations on all your diamonds throughout the end of 2011. If you fall into this category, please call 1-888-GEMPRINT or 1-212-997-0007 and ask to speak with Angelo Palmieri.

Dec 12, 2008

GCAL Certifies Waldman’s Canadian Diamonds
By JCK Online Staff

The Waldman Diamond Company is working with Gem Certification & Assurance Lab to certify diamonds mined in Canada, and specifically, from the Diavik Diamond Mine, located in the Northwest Territories of Canada.

This program is designed to ensures that the diamonds compliant with the Kimberley Process and the Canadian Diamond Code of Conduct. The Diavik mine has been consistently praised for adhering to the highest environmental & safety standards, as well as, contributing significantly to the social and economic activity of the Northwest Terroritories of Canada.

GCAL was chosen for its ability to accomplish this level of transparency through its Source VeritasTM Process and Gemprint technology, the process for finding a diamond’s unique optical fingerprint. Presently, the Israeli, New York, and Vancouver, Canada, Waldman factories and offices are equipped with Gemprint instruments. In addition, each Canadian Source VeritasTM diamond comes with the GCAL 4C’s Zero Tolerance Consumer Grading Guarantee, which provides consumers with the added assurance that their diamond was graded accurately. GCAL

Waldman Diamond Company, founded in 1978 by Alexander Waldman, is a multi-national dynamic diamond & jewelry manufacturer that is consistently ranked in the top tier of Israeli Diamond Exporters.

Canadian diamonds are available for purchase by the diamond industry on Certified Diamond Exchange, www.CDEdiamonds.com, along with Fair Trade diamonds sourced and polished from Botswana.

Nov 11, 2008
 

BOTSWANA ‘SOURCE VERITAS’ DIAMONDS

GCAL is working with MOTIGANZ, a DTC Sightholder, to certify diamonds sourced, cut and polished in Botswana. This program assures consumers that the diamonds they are purchasing are compliant, not only with the Kimberley Process, a set of international trading laws that prohibit so-called ‘conflict diamonds’, but also the strict adherence to GCAL’s Source Veritas™ process of positively identifying and tracing polished diamonds through the use of Gemprint® from the factory through the market, and beyond.

GCAL was chosen primarily for its ability to accomplish this level of transparency through its exclusive Gemprint® technology and its commitment to the highest and most transparent industry practices.

Consumers are becoming more and more conscious about whether their diamonds are conflict free, and GCAL has the process necessary to ensure that the diamonds graded in our lab are free of conflict. Gemprint® can track the diamonds from rough to end product, and GCAL certification also gives you a lot of added value including laser inscription, photomicrographs and light performance analysis.

Botswana is one of the world’s most important diamond sources, creating a huge opportunity for the country’s growth through industry. “Botswana is also one of the very few African democracies that actually works,” explains Donald A. Palmieri, GCAL President. “This is why I am particularly happy to confirm with the written blessing and encouragement of Dr. Tombale, Minister of Mines and Diamond Hub Coordinator for Botswana, we will begin certifying ‘Made in Botswana’ diamonds in a co-branded certificate.”

July 5, 2006
 

Diamond certifier shakes up industry - Business – New York Times
By Matthew Healey

NEW YORK — Under heavy guard, every diamond, emerald, sapphire and other gem in this midtown New York office building gets a thorough workover by experts and their instruments: hot and cold lasers, custom-built spectrometers and high-power microscopes.

In one corner of the Gem Certification and Assurance Lab, Lioudmila Tretiakova, a leading gemstone expert, cools a diamond with liquid nitrogen and examines a spectrometer reading showing that the gem's color was artificially lightened to increase its desirability. To keep an unscrupulous seller from overcharging for it, this fact will be noted on the diamond's certificate.

Tens of thousands of gems are inspected and certified annually by the lab in a meticulous process that soon may bring profound change to the famously secretive diamond industry, which long has been averse to any measures that would give greater transparency to its dealings or allow auditing of the trade.

Diamond dealers around the world historically operated on trust and a handshake, but that no longer is good enough in a world where diamonds are sometimes traded to pay for civil wars and terrorism.

Dealers are also getting skittish in anticipation of a Warner Brothers movie to be released in early 2007 in which Leonardo DiCaprio plays a smuggler caught up in trafficking of diamonds for arms in the Sierra Leone civil war, which ended in 2002. Dealers worry that so-called blood diamonds will stigmatize diamonds from legitimate sources.

Diamond wholesalers have an agreement among about 90 countries that effectively ensures that rough, or uncut, diamonds come only from legitimate sources. But not much has been done to reassure buyers of cut diamonds at the retail level.

That is where the lab hopes to build its business, by issuing certificates that follow individual diamonds, from the time a rough stone is cut into a jewel through every subsequent sale, thus guaranteeing buyers they are getting "clean" diamonds.

Although there is practically no way to test a stone retroactively to determine its origin, certificates like those from the lab offer a guarantee for any recently mined stone that conforms to a worldwide agreement called the Kimberley Process.

The Diamond Trading Company, an arm of De Beers, the world's biggest diamond company, said in a recent statement concerning the lab that "any initiative that supports ethical practices throughout the industry and which is to the ultimate benefit of the consumer, is to be commended."

The Diamond Trading Company, which is based in London, said in the statement that it would encourage the lab to make its service available to other companies.

While several companies offer gem certificates, Donald Palmieri, the president of Gem Certification and Assurance Lab, said his lab is the only one to guarantee its work. Another organization, the Gemological Institute of America, was caught in a scandal a few months ago when several of its employees were accused of giving diamonds higher grades than they deserved. The institute does not guarantee its certificates.

One of the features that makes Palmieri's lab certificates effective is the use of a device called Gemprint, which, by shining a laser through a diamond, captures its unique sparkle pattern, just like a human fingerprint.

A copy of this Gemprint image goes on each certificate, making it impossible to switch stones or claim that a stone is better than it really is. The guarantee can only be thwarted by completely recutting a diamond, at a considerable loss in size and value.

An Israeli company originally developed the Gemprint technology 25 years ago, but the technology is only now coming into commercial use, partly because of resistance from the diamond trade.

Another reasons is that "nobody could figure out what to do with it profitably," said Michael Haynes, the chief executive of Collectors Universe, a company that acquired the lab and Gemprint late last year.

Palmieri, 59, a former diamond miner who is widely regarded as a gems expert, said Gemprint certificates had been accepted in law enforcement and the insurance business, because they aided in identifying stolen jewelry.

Getting the diamond trade to participate took longer, Palmieri said, because obtaining a certificate for every single cut stone obliges diamond dealers to provide an audit trail for the rough stones they handle. This is something that dealers have resisted in the past, he said.

The lab keeps a database of every stone it certifies, which now includes half a million cut diamonds. Palmieri expects to be adding that many more per year within a few years.

Once the lab has certified a diamond, company experts use a cold laser to engrave a logo and serial number onto its rim, though Palmieri admits that such markings, only a few microns deep, could be easily removed.

It remains to be seen whether, or how fast, the lab certificates catch on in the retail diamond trade. It may be some time before there really are no more secrets, bloody or otherwise, in the gem trade.

Apr 20, 2006

Collectors Universe's Diamond Grading Unit GCAL Selected by the Government of the Northwest Territories to Provide Services for Its Diamond Certification Program

NEWPORT BEACH, Calif., April 20 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- Collectors Universe, Inc. (Nasdaq: CLCT), a leading provider of value-added authentication and grading services to dealers and collectors of high-value collectibles and diamonds, today announced that its diamond grading division, Gem Certification & Assurance Lab, Inc. (GCAL), has been selected by the Government of the Northwest Territories of Canada (GNWT) to provide Gemprint digital imaging as the unique identification technology for the GNWT's diamond certification program.

The selection of GCAL to provide Gemprint digital imaging is part of the continuation of an existing GNWT program that began in 2001 whereby diamonds are certified, at the option of the diamond manufacturer, by GNWT as being mined, cut and polished in the Northwest Territories. The Gemprint process is a non-invasive, patented identification technology that captures and stores a digital image of the unique refractive pattern that is, in essence, the diamond's "fingerprint." To participate in the GNWT certification program, a diamond manufacturer is required to use GCAL's certification service, which includes a Gemprint digital image of the diamond. GCAL forwards that Gemprint image to the GNWT for inclusion as a part of the GNWT diamond certificate. Each GNWT diamond certificate is signed by the Premier of the GNWT and is provided to the diamond manufacturer and can accompany the diamond through the various distribution channels to the retail counter. Because the Gemprint image for a GNWT certified diamond can be retrieved from GCAL's database at any point in the distribution process for matching to the GNWT certificate, there is an increased level of security against anyone being able to successfully substitute, during the distribution process, diamonds sourced outside of the Northwest Territories for the diamonds that have been certified by the GNWT.

In addition to these services, GCAL will support a co-marketing program with the GNWT to promote diamonds from the Northwest Territories that are certified under this GNWT program.

GCAL plans to market its diamond grading services and related bundled services, such as direct light performance, together with its Gemprint service, to the Northwest Territories diamond manufacturers. According to the GNWT, in 2004, an estimated total of 12.6 million carats or $1.65 billion USD in rough diamonds from the Northwest Territories were processed, although not all of this production participated in the GNWT certification program. Canada is the third largest producer of diamonds in the world. (Source: 2005 Diamond Industry Report, Diamond Facts, Northwest Territories Canada)

GCAL President Don Palmieri commented, "The Canadian diamond program is the most noted verified source program and it is an ideal match for GCAL and the GCAL Five Star Diamond Certificate, since we already include the Gemprint identification 'fingerprint' as one of the five stars from our services."

Chief Executive Officer of Collectors Universe, Michael Haynes said, "Diamonds sourced from the Northwest Territories are becoming more important in the U.S. and world markets. We believe that the combination of the Northwest Territories certification and the associated GCAL Gemprint will increase the confidence of the diamond buyer regarding the source of these Canadian diamonds. This agreement represents another step in our efforts to become a driving force in the diamond authentication and grading market."

More information about the GNWT certification program and diamonds can be found here.

Sep 1, 2003

Gemprint is pleased to announce the introduction of its Gemprint ISi Verification System, designed specifically for diamond dealers who send and receive memo goods on a regular basis.

PROTECT YOUR INVENTORY. Diamond dealers value the Gemprint ISi Verification System because it provides a ‘proof-positive court-accepted’ means of identification of stones shipped on memo and subsequently returned. This foolproof verification may prove critical in disputes over ownership in UCC and bankruptcy cases. In addition, having your entire diamond inventory Gemprinted may allow you to qualify for jeweler’s block insurance policy discounts.

Diamond dealers like Louis Glick & Company and Olympic Diamonds in New York, as well as Solomon Brothers in Atlanta, are already taking advantage of the security provided through their use of the Gemprint ISi Verification System for memo goods.

Gemprint is the computerized identification system for diamonds. Like a fingerprint, every diamond has a unique visual signature. No two diamonds are alike. Gemprint utilizes a low intensity laser to capture a diamond’s unique ‘sparkle pattern’. A computer then scans and captures the image, or ‘fingerprint’, and saves this image along with relevant information about the diamond to your computer. This enables subsequent tracking and/or verification of the stone. A Gemprint cannot be detected or erased, unlike laser inscription.

The Gemprint ISi Verification System is simple to operate, and can be integrated with your existing inventory control software. A Gemprint is captured on-site, takes just seconds and is non-intrusive. Any diamond .05 cts or larger can be Gemprinted. We recommend Gemprinting all diamonds .25 cts or larger. Diamonds can be Gemprinted mounted or loose.

Jan 8, 2001
 

ZALES The Diamond Store™

Irving, TX- Gemprint Corporation is pleased to announce that Zales The Diamond Store™ will provide Gemprint registrations with selected diamonds sold through its 1300 retail stores across America. M. Fabrikant & Sons in New York will Gemprint the diamonds.

Gemprint technology provides a ‘value-add’ to diamond customers of Zales The Diamond Store™ in the form of registration and security of ownership. The consumer will be provided by Zales with a custom designed Gemprint Certificate of Registration. Should the diamond ever be lost or stolen, registration in the Gemprint international database may help speed recovery of the diamond. Gemprint will also allow the consumer to positively identify their diamond should it ever need to be reset, repaired or cleaned. Major insurance companies recognize Gemprint and offer discounts if the diamond has been Gemprinted.

James Tuck, Sales & Marketing Manager for Gemprint Corporation, described Zales The Diamond Store™ use of Gemprint as “another step in the continuing development of jewelry sector leaders making use of Gemprint technology, ensuring security for both the consumer and retailer in the growing retail diamond business.”

Zale Corporation is the largest specialty retailer of fine jewelry in North America, operating approximately 2,350 specialty retail jewelry locations and kiosks located throughout the United States, Canada, and Puerto Rico. Zale Corporation has achieved its reputation by developing long-term customer relationships built on quality, merchandise, value and service. Zale Corporation is headquartered in Irving, Texas.

Nov 30, 2000

The World’s Largest Internet Retailer of Certified Diamonds Diamond.com

Sunrise, FL- Gemprint Corporation is pleased to announce that Diamond.com provides Gemprint registrations with diamonds sold through its e-commerce site. Diamond.com features Gemprint on its site through several links.

The Diamond.com e-commerce site (http://www.diamond.com) offers consumers the largest inventory of certified diamonds in the world. The Steinmetz Diamond Group, a leading international diamond manufacturing trading group with a 70-year heritage in the diamond industry, is a principal shareholder of Diamond.com’s parent company, Odimo.com. One of the largest customers of De Beers, The Steinmetz Diamond Group was entrusted by De Beers to design and cut the world’s most valuable diamond – the Millennium Star, a 203-carat, D color, flawless diamond, which is currently exhibited at the Millennium Dome in London. Diamond.com is headquartered in Sunrise, Florida.

Gemprint technology provides a ‘value-add’ to diamond customers of Diamond.com in the form of registration and security of ownership. The consumer will be provided with a Gemprint Certificate of Registration. Should the diamond ever be lost or stolen, registration in the Gemprint international database may help speed recovery of the diamond. Gemprint will also allow the consumer to positively identify their diamond should it ever need to be reset, repaired or cleaned. Major insurance companies recognize Gemprint and offer discounts if the diamond has been Gemprinted.

James Tuck, Sales & Marketing Manager for Gemprint Corporation, described Diamond.com’s use of Gemprint as “a significant step toward ensuring security for both the retailer and consumer in the growing internet diamond business.” 

Nov 28, 2000

Network Television Series Law & Order To Feature
GEMPRINT™ “the fingerprint system for diamonds” In Upcoming Episode

Toronto, Canada- Gemprint Corporation is pleased to announce that its diamond identification technology will be featured in an upcoming episode of the network television series Law & Order.

The one-hour episode titled “Hubris” will air Wednesday January 10th, 2001 at 10:00 PM ET/PT on NBC.

Law & Order is produced by Wolf Films in association with Studios USA Television. Filmed entirely in New York City, Law & Order looks at crime and justice from a unique two-tiered perspective. The television series has developed a reputation as being one of the most prescient storytellers on television. Dick Wolf is creator and executive producer. Arthur Penn and William Finkelstein are executive producers. Kathy McCormick and Jeffrey Hayes are the co-executive producers.

James Tuck, Sales & Marketing Manager for Gemprint Corporation, stated “the representation of Gemprint as a means of positive identification for diamonds and as irrefutable evidence in a court of law further solidifies the role of Gemprint as a leader in the field of diamond identification on an international level.”

Nov 8, 2000

New York Grading Lab Implements Use of GEMPRINT™ ‘The fingerprint system for diamonds’

New York City, NY- Gemprint Corporation is pleased to announce that it has signed an agreement with IGL (International Gemological Laboratories) to provide Gemprint registration services through their lab situated within the ‘diamond district’ in the heart of New York City.

Independent Gemological Laboratories grades and appraises diamonds and other gemstones. IGL provides services to retailers and jewelry professionals, as well as consumers. They offer a variety of grading certificates for both loose and mounted stones, including “The Full Page Report”, The Tri-fold Report” and “The Diamond Passport”. Their appraisal services provide either an Appraisal Certificate or Appraisal Card. IGL is situated at 6 East 45th Street, New York, NY.

Gemprint will be offered by IGL in addition to their current services. Gemprint technology provides a system that will allow IGL to determine if a diamond has previously been graded or appraised through their lab. For IGL’s customers, Gemprint will provide a ‘value-add’ in the form of registration and security of ownership. Customers will be provided with a Gemprint Certificate of Registration. Should the diamond ever be lost or stolen, registration in the Gemprint international database may help speed recovery of the diamond. Gemprint will also allow customers to positively identify their diamond should it ever need to be reset, repaired or cleaned. Major insurance companies recognize Gemprint and offer discounts if the diamond has been Gemprinted.

Aug 10, 2000

GEMPRINT™ ‘Fingerprint System for Diamonds’ NOW OFFERED BY NAMANO, INC.

Tucker, Georgia- Gemprint Corporation is pleased to announce that it has signed an agreement with Namano, Inc. to offer Gemprint diamond identification and registration services with loose diamonds and diamond jewelry sold to the company’s independent retailers. Namano, headquartered in Tucker, Georgia, is an established diamond importer, as well as a manufacturer and distributor of fine diamond jewelry.

Gus Callaway, President of Namano, Inc., says “offering a Gemprint registration with our diamonds will provide our retailers with a significant selling tool, and their customers with a means of positive identification, security and the opportunity of insurance discounts.” Namano introduced Gemprint to their clients during the Atlanta Jewelry Show (SJTA) in early August.

Namano, Inc. is the sister company of Southeastern Findings, a 27-year-old business that supplies the manufacturing jeweler with gold and platinum settings and mounts, and manufactures 14K chain and Noble solder.

Mr. John Shepherd, Chairman of Gemprint Corporation, noted that “the use of Gemprint by Namano establishes a relationship with one of North America’s most progressive diamond importers and diamond jewelry manufacturers.”

June 7, 2000

CVF TECHNOLOGIES CORPORATION’S SUBSIDIARY, GEMPRINT™ CORPORATION ANNOUNCES ADDING LEADING INTERNET RETAILER

Lewiston, NY- CVF Technologies Corporation’s (AMEX:CNV) subsidiary, Gemprint™ Corporation (73% owned by CVF), announced the signing of an agreement with Ashford.com (NASDAQ: ASFD) a leading internet retailer of luxury and premium products. Ashford.com will provide Gemprint™ identification and registrations with diamonds sold through its e-commerce site.

Ashford.com e-commerce site (http://www.ashford.com) offers a vast selection of diamonds. Dedicated to creating a comfortable and safe shopping environment, Ashford.com, headquartered in Houston, Texas, offers customers the Ashford.com Protection Plan™ policy, which provides best-in-industry warranties, privacy and security.

Gemprint™ Technology provides a "value-add" to diamond customers of Ashford.com in the form of registration and security of ownership. The consumer will be provided with a Gemprint™ Certificate of Registration. Should the diamond ever be lost or stolen, registration in the Gemprint™ international database may help speed recovery of the diamond. Gemprint™ will also allow the consumer to positively identify their diamond should it ever need to be reset, repaired or cleaned. Major insurance companies recognize Gemprint™ and offer discounts if the diamond has been Gemprinted™.

Mr. John Shepherd, Chairman and CEO of Gemprint™ Corporation stated that "This agreement signifies a major bridgehead for Gemprint™ in the growing Internet diamond trading business."

Mr. Jeffrey Dreben, Chairman & CEO of CVF Technologies Corporation emphasized, "The Ashford.com use of the Gemprint™ technology once again demonstrates that Gemprint™ has become a standard for the secure trading of diamonds both on and off the Net. SOURCE: Gemprint(TM) Corporation

May 25, 2000
 

GEMPRINT™ ALLOWS MICHIGAN JEWELER TO HELP PROTECT HIMSELF FROM FUTURE THEFTS

Grandville, MI- Following the recent theft of more than $150,000 (USD) worth of diamonds at cost in a distraction larceny, Richard Engels Jewelers has decided to protect itself in the event of future thefts.

The Grandville, Michigan jeweler will Gemprint all diamonds in stock, thereby protecting their investment. Should these diamonds ever be stolen and subsequently recovered, each diamond’s unique ‘fingerprint’ will provide a court-accepted means of identification.

Dennis Engels of Richard Engels Jewelers thought that with the recovery of some of the diamonds stolen from his store, he would have no trouble having the known thieves charged and convicted. However, when the issue of positively identifying the recovered diamonds was raised, he was only 90% certain. Law enforcement officials asked Engels if the diamonds had been Gemprinted, to which he responded ‘no’. Had the diamonds been Gemprinted, there would have been no question as to their identity. As a result, and without 100% positive identification, no charges were laid in the case.

Richard Engels Jewelers will also utilize Gemprint as a sales tool. As a ‘value add’ Gemprint will help differentiate their store from the competition. The consumer will be provided with a Gemprint Certificate of Registration, enabling them to receive a 10% insurance discount from one of more than 30 insurance companies. The consumer will also be able to verify that any diamond left to be reset, repaired or cleaned is in fact the diamond they have returned to them. Gemprint will also provide positive identification of the diamond should it ever be lost or stolen.

Gemprint, headquartered in Toronto, Canada, is the world’s first non-intrusive diamond identification system. It allows for the positive identification of diamonds without inscribing or physically altering the stone. Gemprint technology is now used worldwide by e-commerce sites, diamond cutters, gemological laboratories, wholesalers, manufacturers and retailers.

May 18, 2000

GEMPRINT™ ‘Fingerprint System for Diamonds’ IMPLEMENTED BY CANADA’S LARGEST GEM LAB

Toronto, Canada- Gemprint Corporation is pleased to announce that it has concluded an agreement with Gem Scan International Inc., Canada’s largest gemological laboratory, to provide Gemprint diamond identification and registration services. Gem Scan, located in Toronto, Canada, provides gem identification and appraisal services to the jewelry trade and public.

Sam Barbuzzi of Gem Scan says that the addition of the Gemprint "fingerprinting" system for diamonds, to their high-tech lab services, "will provide our trade and retail customers with positive identification, electronic data storage, security and peace of mind". Diamond importers, jewelry manufacturers, large retail jewelry chains, independent jewelers, the insurance sector and the consumer utilize Gem Scan services.

Barbuzzi adds the use of Gemprint "along with Gem Scan’s exclusive Lazare Kaplan laser inscription technology, makes [Gem Scan] the only independent gemological laboratory in North America to provide both visible and invisible proof positive identification of diamonds".

Mr. John Shepherd, Chairman of Gemprint Corporation, noted that the Gemprint ISi LAB System offers significant added value to the appraisal community, and that this agreement establishes a relationship with one of North America’s most progressive gemological laboratories.

Gemprint is the world’s first non-intrusive diamond identification system. It allows for the positive identification of diamonds without inscribing or physically altering the stone. Gemprint technology is now used worldwide by diamond cutters, gemological laboratories, wholesalers, manufacturers and retailers. Gemprint is headquartered in Toronto, Canada.

May 1, 2000

RockMusic: Making Diamonds Sing Features
By Rob Bates, Senior Editor

This story appears in the May 2000 issue of JCK magazine

It's an out-of-this-world idea that—appropriately enough—first hit Gabi Tolkowsky on an airplane. “I was talking to my wife about diamond cutting,” remembers the famed cutter, who is best known for fashioning the 273-ct. “De Beers Centenary.” “I said, 'Diamond cutting has so many aspects to it, so many variations, it's like making music. Then it hit me. Music is a wonderful thing. It's the language of the world. Why can't a diamond give off music?' ”

Most people would've blamed the idea on oxygen deprivation, but the more Tolkowsky thought about it, the more it made sense. “What is light but waves?” he notes. “So can't a diamond send back sound waves, too?” Apparently, it can—with the help of technology. As improbable as it seems, the bushy-haired Belgian has found a way to produce music from diamonds. He premiered his first “compositions” to a rapt audience at The JCK Show in Orlando.

How did he do it? Last year, Tolkowksy approached Gemprint, the Toronto company that gives a distinct “fingerprint” to each stone. “Gemprint captures the light refraction on paper. I wanted to capture it in sound,” he says. Company chairman John Shepherd recalls Tolkowsky asking him if it was possible to convert light into sound. “I said, That's a perfectly valid scientific concept,' ” Shepherd recalls. But even he didn't expect the second part of the proposition. “It took my breath away,” he says. “I'd say the reaction was one of pleased astonishment. But there was no reason why it couldn't be done.”

Within two months, Gemprint engineers created software that matches degrees of light intensity to notes on the musical scale. The parties won't give more specifics on the technology involved, since the idea is being patented. But Shepherd does say, “Gemprint puts laser light into the diamond and then picks up reflections, which show up as points of light. They appear as a bit-map, which we digitize for the Gemprint database. Then we use software to take that bit-map and create sound out of it.”

So far the Gemprint-Tolkowsky alliance has created a number of preliminary melodies. Tolkowsky says that when he heard his first diamond-derived compositions, “I never jumped as high as I jumped.” The diamond songs are played by computer-derived “bells,” which Tolkowsky chose because they sound like diamonds. “I wanted it to sound like angel music,” he says.

And, in a way, it does. While you won't likely be hearing Tolkowsky's tunes on the radio anytime soon, they are certainly striking. The compositions are spacey, discordant—and, in their own way, beautiful. “It's the kind of music that makes you sit down and dream,” he says. Best of all, the variations are endless. Since no diamond is the same, each has a unique “melody.” Gemprint, meanwhile, thinks the music can be further refined. “Those tones could be translated into some form of harmony as we develop further engineering,” Shepherd predicts.

Retailers who heard Tolkowsky's melodies at The JCK Show thought that the idea had incredible implications, from the fanciful to the commercial. Some fantasized about selling not just a diamond's specs and certificate, but also its song. “The more you romance a diamond, the easier it is to sell,” notes Hoyt Perry of Perry's Jewelry, Awards and Gifts in Fayetteville, Ark. “And if you presented a diamond with its special music behind it, how could anyone say no?” Others were similarly struck. Outside the “Touch the Future” exhibit, where Tolkowksy appeared, someone scribbled “Gabi is king.”

For now, Tolkowsky isn't sure what he wants to do with his discovery but would like U.S. retailers to tell him how they could use it in their stores. (You can fax him at 011-32-3-226-9459.) “We don't want this to be just a gimmick,” he says. For all the razzle-dazzle behind the idea, it has a serious purpose: to return diamond retailing to its roots in romance. “Everyone thinks that diamonds shouldn't be sold as a commodity, but as objects of beauty,” he says. “This uses modern technology in the service of emotion.”

And Tolkowsky has another dream: He wants blind musicians to hear his diamond symphonies. “Imagine a blind person being able to appreciate the beauty of a diamond by listening to it,” he says. With his new invention, Tolkowksy has showed us that just about anything's possible.

Gabi Tolkowsky's Extravaganza in Savannah

The first live public performance of a piece of “diamond music” took place in March in Savannah, Ga.

It was part of a “Savannah Diamond Dinner,” designed to fête Gabi Tolkowsky's new “Savannah cut.” Tolkowsky invented the cut while visiting a local jeweler to tout his “Gabrielle” diamond. He took a tour of the local Lucas Theater and was struck by its recently renovated dome.

Forty-five minutes later, he had a new dome-inspired cut, which he dubbed the “Savannah” as a tribute to the city. “Cutting this diamond for the people of Savannah is an honor for me,” he says. “It gives me a chance to show my sentiments to these people who have given me so much wonderful hospitality and friendship. When I was giving a lecture, I asked if I should create a new cut and name it after Savannah, and everyone applauded.”

The dinner featured not only the introduction of the new cut but also the music of a 3.43-ct. example. Also on the program was a more conventional musical performance, as the Savannah Symphony played Rachmaninoff. Afterward, the large Savannah and two smaller ones (1.5 cts. each) were auctioned off, with proceeds going to Savannah Onstage, a local arts festival, and the Matthew Reardon Foundation for Neurological Disorders, which treats children with brain diseases. All proceeds from the dinner went to Savannah Onstage.

Feb 10, 2000

CVF Technologies Corporation's Subsidiary, Gemprint(TM) Corporation Announces Distributorship Agreement with Breebaart Group

Lewiston, NY- CVF Technologies Corporation's (Amex: CNV) subsidiary, Gemprint(TM) Corporation, announces that it has signed a multi-year master distributorship agreement for Europe with Breebaart Group B.V. of Rotterdam. The Gemprint(TM) proprietary diamond identification system will be marketed through national sub-distributors to retail jewelers, diamond wholesalers and manufacturers. Initial emphasis will be on Italy, Germany, Scandinavia and the Benelux countries.

Breebaart Group comprises of several companies specializing in the field of gemstones and gemstone related services. The Breebaart Group has been in the jewelry industry for over a century with an extensive distribution network across Europe, with over 2000 clients. Jan Sluis, director of the Breebaart Group, is an expert gemologist and has extensive experience in both the wholesale and retail sector and is an excellent partner for the expansion of Gemprint(TM) technology throughout Europe.

Director of Breebaart Group B.V., Jan Sluis, stated, "As a life-long professional gemologist in the diamond and jewelry business, I have been looking for a system to identify and register diamonds, as a means of providing customers with confidence in their purchase and ownership of diamonds. The Gemprint(TM) system meets this critical requirement and offers a unique, non-invasive solution to diamond identification. I anticipate the successful adoption of the Gemprint(TM) system by the European market place.''

John Shepherd, Chairman of Gemprint(TM), said, "We are delighted to be working with the Breebaart Group. They are a Partner of high integrity, with a wealth of experience in the jewelry business, and with many strong contacts throughout Europe.'' Gemprint(TM) is also focusing its efforts on developing relationships with the 400 websites that trade diamonds over the Internet. The

Gemprint(TM) identification technology is the enabling technology to allow for a secure purchase of a diamond over the Internet and its web licensees will pay Gemprint(TM) a user fee every time a diamond transaction takes place.
CVF Technologies Corporation's (Amex: CNV) subsidiary, Gemprint(TM) Corporation, announces that it has signed a multi-year master distributorship agreement for Europe with Breebaart Group B.V. of Rotterdam. The Gemprint(TM) proprietary diamond identification system will be marketed through national sub-distributors to retail jewelers, diamond wholesalers and manufacturers. Initial emphasis will be on Italy, Germany, Scandinavia and the Benelux countries.

Breebaart Group comprises of several companies specializing in the field of gemstones and gemstone related services. The Breebaart Group has been in the jewelry industry for over a century with an extensive distribution network across Europe, with over 2000 clients. Jan Sluis, director of the Breebaart Group, is an expert gemologist and has extensive experience in both the wholesale and retail sector and is an excellent partner for the expansion of Gemprint(TM) technology throughout Europe.

Director of Breebaart Group B.V., Jan Sluis, stated, "As a life-long professional gemologist in the diamond and jewelry business, I have been looking for a system to identify and register diamonds, as a means of providing customers with confidence in their purchase and ownership of diamonds. The Gemprint(TM) system meets this critical requirement and offers a unique, non-invasive solution to diamond identification. I anticipate the successful adoption of the Gemprint(TM) system by the European market place.''

John Shepherd, Chairman of Gemprint(TM), said, "We are delighted to be working with the Breebaart Group. They are a Partner of high integrity, with a wealth of experience in the jewelry business, and with many strong contacts throughout Europe.'' Gemprint(TM) is also focusing its efforts on developing relationships with the 400 websites that trade diamonds over the Internet. The

Gemprint(TM) identification technology is the enabling technology to allow for a secure purchase of a diamond over the Internet and its web licensees will pay Gemprint(TM) a user fee every time a diamond transaction takes place.

Oct 5, 1998

Stuller Embraces Digital Gemprint
By Gary Roskin, G.G., FGA, Senior Editor

GemNotes This article appeared in the October 1998 issue of JCK:

Stuller Settings Inc., one of the largest U.S. jewelry manufacturers, now offers a registration certificate from Gemprint with every diamond of 3/8 ct. or larger.

Remember Gemprint? It’s the Toronto company that in the early 1980s developed a way to identify diamonds by capturing a laser-reflection pattern on Polaroid film. Now that these images can be stored digitally and readily retrieved on a personal computer, it’s far easier than it once was to match a wayward diamond with its recorded image.

New and improved. Those who have known Gemprint since its beginnings remember retaining a copy of the Polaroid and sending another copy to Gemprint for storage. A lost or stolen diamond, once found, could be photographed using a similar Gemprint machine, and this photo in turn could be used to trace the gem to its rightful source.

In theory it seemed like a clever idea. In practice, matching the photo to its identical counterpart among the thousands of photos in storage proved to be an arduous and sometimes futile effort. Still, Gemprint claims to have helped recover more than $1 million worth of stolen diamonds.

With digital reproduction, the idea is the same – photographing laser light reflections from within a gem – but the information is captured, stored, compared, matched, and retrieved in seconds. This information is shared instantly among a global network of jewelers and law-enforcement officials.

How does it work? The diamond is placed in the path of a laser beam. The laser reflections coming back from the diamond create a unique fingerprint-like pattern that’s digitally captured in the memory of a computer. Being able to capture this fingerprint quickly and accurately enables you to register gems being sold or taken in for repair and to control and track inventory. You keep this Gemprint on file in your personal computer or with Gemprint’s international database. No matter where a lost or stolen diamond is recovered, you can use this technology to match digital Gemprints and determine the provenance of the gem.

Laser inscription or Gemprint? No identification feature is fail-safe. Like laser inscription, a Gemprint can be altered if the diamond is repolished. But the benefit of using Gemprint is that it can’t be detected the way laser inscriptions can.

An observer can readily view laser inscriptions with a 10x loupe. That’s both good and bad. It’s good because an inscription can be easily identified by a jeweler, consumer, or law-enforcement officer. It’s bad because it can also be detected by a thief, who can have the inscription polished away. Since there’s no way for the thief to know that a diamond has been Gemprinted, the diamond is unlikely to be repolished. That’s a huge plus in the effort to recover stolen diamonds.

A win-win situation. A Gemprint registration gives retail jewelers an additional selling tool and offers consumers an extra incentive to buy the product. As it is, Stuller already provides a number of useful sales tools. “We already give a diamond-grading analysis on our loose diamonds of 3/8 ct. and larger,” says Stuller spokesman Steve MacDiarmid. The company also offers proportion analysis using Sarin’s Dia-mension measurements and color-grading analysis using a Gran colorimeter.

Joe Buttross, vice president of Stuller’s diamond division, says he’s always been in favor of some kind of identification. The company considered laser inscription. Yet the costs are quite high if you do it in-house. It also takes a lot of time to develop the process. In fact, it may not be feasible anyway because of protected patents for laser inscription.

With Gemprint, Stuller can offer an identification feature right away, and do it in-house in a timely and cost-effective manner. A Gemprint can even lower a retail customer’s premiums on replacement insurance. Is it any wonder that Stuller likes Gemprint and sees it as a way to generate more sales?

Dec 8, 1996

BOOK 'EM
By Russell Shor, Contributing Editor

GemNotes This article appeared in the December 1996 issue of JCK:

Jewelry customers might sleep a little more soundly at night knowing their precious diamonds are protected by an invincible crimefighter.

Gemprint(tm), a computerized identification system for diamonds, looks less intimidating than a gun-toting police officer or a superhero in a red cape and tights. But the laser equipment and PC software package -- an upgraded version of the 19-year-old Gemprint system -- is designed for unquestionable ID of loose and mounted diamonds.

Gemprint was founded in 1977 on the premise that no two diamonds are alike. The system records the subtle distinctions in diamond cuts, just as fingerprinting does for people. A low-powered laser shines through a diamond to reflect the "sparkle pattern" of the diamond as created by the angles of its cut. In the original Gemprint equipment, a piece of Polaroid film was placed against the laser pattern, and a photograph was taken of the diamond's sparkle. The photograph could be used to recognize the diamond if it were lost or replaced with another.

When Gemprint became a division of Omphalos Recovery Systems Inc. of Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada, in 1987, the new owners set out to find a more efficient and effective method. "It needed to be computerized," says Jim Engdahl, Gemprint's president and chief executive officer. "That's the real benefit of the technology."

The result is the Interactive Scanning Instrument, a condensed version of the previous diamond scanners, which plugs into a PC (model 486 or faster using Windows 3.11 or higher). The laser captures the sparkle pattern of the diamond, then produces it on the screen. Retailers record this pattern with the owner's name and information about the diamond.

"There's so much concern about getting back the same diamond that you leave for a repair," says Steven Rosen of Sydney Rosen Co. in Philadelphia, Pa. Rosen's company has used Gemprint in its various forms for years and switched almost a year ago to the computerized version. When a customer brings in diamond jewelry for repair, he or she watches a salesperson make a Gemprint of the diamond and then receives a printed version. When it's time to pick up the jewelry, the diamond is scanned again. This time, the computer matches the new pattern with the one in the database. When the patterns match, the customer knows it's the same diamond.

Rosen also uses Gemprint in the selling process so customers know the diamonds they choose are not switched.

More confidence, less crime: Besides increasing consumer confidence in a store, Gemprint is designed to take a bite out of crime on a bigger scale. When a customer buys a diamond, retailers complete a registration form with detailed information about the customer and a description of the stone. The registration and the scan of the diamond are submitted to the Gemprint International Database, routinely accessed by law enforcement agencies, including the FBI. The database also registers the serial numbers of high-end watches.

More than $672 million worth of jewelry has been registered in the database in the hopes that, if thieves fancy the valuables, they will be recovered and returned to their rightful owners. Gemprint says more than $1 million in stolen jewelry has been recovered through its database.

The idea that diamonds could be seen again after they are stolen is especially appealing to insurance companies. In fact, many offer 10% premium discounts for diamond jewelry registered with Gemprint; some even require it for high-value or high-risk jewelry.

Engdahl estimates 500 to 600 retailers use the old Gemprint system and already 50 to 100 use the new one. "As we expand and grow into more public markets, we plan to launch the product on a global basis," he says. A major score in that direction is the addition of the Goldsmiths Group, a 196-store retail jewelry chain in the United Kingdom that became a Gemprint dealer and ordered 60 systems in September.

Goldsmiths and other retailers have said they plan to use the new Gemprint system as a value-added incentive and marketing tool to convince customers of their trustworthiness. Gemprint retailers use the technology with the strong belief that a confident customer is a buying customer. "It gives us a competitive edge in the marketplace," says Rosen. "Gemprint adds a tremendous amount of credibility to the sale."